Featured Videos

Weekly Featured Writers

Each week, 1-2 people will curate the ideas and writing from our class into a featured blog. We will use these blogs to connect with colleagues outside our course.

@drjaxon

RT @DMLAmanda The first case study of Anythink Libraries is hot off the presses from the Capturing Connected Learning in Libraries project! Please share with your networks about the innovative things they are doing at @ilovemyanythink! @yalsa @YoumediaNetwork @US_IMLS twitter.com/TheCLAll…

Stuff & Things

Stuff & Things

We can share things we like or post questions for class. Here are some random literacy related videos and texts I appreciate, plus ideas for class…


Jan 28 class:

Looking across your pilot data, what are reading and writing for?

How could you quantify everyone’s literacy notes? What categories emerge? What literate activities take up the most time? What counts as a literacy: how did you decide to say “this is an example of a literacy”? Did literacy things get left out?

What activities [were] carried out with written symbols? What significance [do you] attach to them and what status is conferred on those who engage in them?  (modified from Scribner page 2)

How do you account for activity, production, consumption, circulation, and distribution?

Literacy as a set of socially organized practices which make use of a symbol system and a technology for producing and disseminating it. Literacy is not simply knowing how to read and write a particular script but applying this knowledge for specific purposes in specific contexts of use. A piece of writing, whatever its form, serves as a flag to signal activities in the ongoing stream of behavior that may have some component skills in common (258).

Scribner, S. & Cole, M. (1981) The psychology of literacy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

 

 


Resource for literacy data: LINK


https://www.eff.org/


Connected Learning Alliance

 

 

 

 

 

danah boyd’s recent SXSWEdu Keynote: What Hath We Wrought


Hearing Students’ Voices

Adam Banks “Ain’t No Walls Behind the Sky, Baby! Funk, Flight, Freedom”

James Gee on Learning with Video Games


ways of describing literacy, literacy practices…

literacy as doing, as a social practice (Barton)

literacy as accomplishing things with reading and writing (Brandt)

Girls use literacy to present a particular kind of self. Literate practices served to mark social boundaries (Finders)

Literacy as the ability to read and write situates literacy in the individual person, rather than in society. The practices of social groups are never just literacy practices; they also involve ways of talking, interacting, thinking, valuing, and believing. Can not pull apart literacy practices from non-literacy practices. (Gee)

Learning to write means learning to write in the ways (genres) those in an activity system write (Russell)

Literacy as a set of socially organized practices, which make use of a symbol system and a technology for producing and disseminating it. Literacy is not simply knowing how to read and write a particular script but applying this knowledge for specific purposes in specific contexts of use. A piece of writing, whatever its form, serves as a flag to signal activities in the ongoing stream of behavior that may have some component skills in common (258). (Scribner and Cole)

Literacy as a shorthand for the social practices and conceptions of reading and writing. ideological model of literacy: concentrate on the specific social practices of reading and writing. significance of socialization process in the construction of meaning of literacy for participants (Street)

conceptions of practice

Scribner and Cole: By practice, we mean a recurrent, goal-directed sequence of activities using a particular technology and particular systems of knowledge. A practice consists of: technology, knowledge, and skills (236). Practice always refers to socially developed and patterned ways of using technology and knowledge to accomplish tasks.

Wenger: Practice is always social practice. Practice: Doing in a historical and social context that give structure and meaning to what we do. as soon as members have access to the practice, they find out what counts


 

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