Notes & Prompts

Well share notes and ideas for discussion here.

April 5

March 29

https://www.eff.org/

March 1

Hearing Students’ Voices

Adam Banks “Ain’t No Walls Behind the Sky, Baby! Funk, Flight, Freedom”

Featured blogs 130P


Feb 15

literacy as doing, as a social practice (Barton)

literacy as accomplishing things with reading and writing (Brandt)

Girls use literacy to present a particular kind of self. Literate practices served to mark social boundaries (Finders)

Literacy as the ability to read and write situates literacy in the individual person, rather than in society. The practices of social groups are never just literacy practices; they also involve ways of talking, interacting, thinking, valuing, and believing. Can not pull apart literacy practices from non-literacy practices. (Gee)

Learning to write means learning to write in the ways (genres) those in an activity system write (Russell)

Literacy as a set of socially organized practices, which make use of a symbol system and a technology for producing and disseminating it. Literacy is not simply knowing how to read and write a particular script but applying this knowledge for specific purposes in specific contexts of use. A piece of writing, whatever its form, serves as a flag to signal activities in the ongoing stream of behavior that may have some component skills in common (258). (Scribner and Cole)

Literacy as a shorthand for the social practices and conceptions of reading and writing. ideological model of literacy: concentrate on the specific social practices of reading and writing. significance of socialization process in the construction of meaning of literacy for participants (Street)

conceptions of practice

Scribner and Cole: By practice, we mean a recurrent, goal-directed sequence of activities using a particular technology and particular systems of knowledge. A practice consists of: technology, knowledge, and skills (236). Practice always refers to socially developed and patterned ways of using technology and knowledge to accomplish tasks.

Wenger: Practice is always social practice. Practice: Doing in a historical and social context that give structure and meaning to what we do. as soon as members have access to the practice, they find out what counts

 

Feb 8

Teams: Sponsorship and Access

Teams: Sponsorship and the Rise in Literacy Standards

Teams: Sponsorship and Appropriation In Literacy Learning

As a group, summarize your section and talk about why it matters to us (prepare to share out with whole class). As part of your discussion: What do the case studies illuminate in your section? What claims is she able to make using the cases as examples?

In a nutshell: summary of your section (major claims), how the case studies function in your section (how do the cases connect to her claims), and why these ideas matter to us?

 

Eli : “Intuitively, sponsors seemed a fitting term for the figures who turned up most typically in people’s memories of literacy learning: older relatives, teachers, priests, supervisors, military officers, editors, influential authors” (167).
Q: If literacy is enhanced by having a literate sponsor sort of pave the way, and we understand that not everyone has access to a literacy sponsorship, then how do we go about structuring and teaching literacy within highschool if everyone has a different experience and knowledge of literacy? Can there even be a centralized form of literacy taught within schools or are we promoting one type of literacy over another?    

 

Matt: “Sarah Steele described how, after joining the law firm, she began to model her household management on principles of budgeting that she was picking up from one of the attorneys with whom she worked most closely” (p. 181).
“Sarah Steele’s act of appropriation in some sense explains how dominant forms of literacy migrate and penetrate into private spheres” (p. 183).

Q. How often do we transfer these skills to other areas of our lives? Is it common? Catherine: Would literacy practices transfer from public to private life only if there is an equivalent task or need in both areas? Or would we create a place in our private lives for the new literacies?

 

Kelsey: “Forms of literacy and their sponsors can now rise and recede many times within a single life span” (178?).
Q. Is there a way to teach certain literacy practices that would make people more adaptive to other new literacy practices they might encounter? Do younger generations, such as millennials, have the ability to adapt easier than older generations because they have either grown up with some of the fastest changes and advancements with technology and literacy practices, or have grown up with the technologies and literacy practices at their fingertips? Is this over-generalizing too much?

 

Keaton: Q: What kind of sponsors exist in the university? Since sponsorship seems to depend on economic and political privileges, what sponsors have we personally used?

 

Early Start

Early Start

 

EPT practice


 

Feb 1

What activities [were] carried out with written symbols? What significance [do you] attach to them and what status is conferred on those who engage in them?  (modified from Scribner page 2)

Looking across your pilot data, what are reading and writing for?

How do you account for activity, production, consumption, circulation, and distribution?

 

Literacy as a set of socially organized practices which make use of a symbol system and a technology for producing and disseminating it. Literacy is not simply knowing how to read and write a particular script but applying this knowledge for specific purposes in specific contexts of use. A piece of writing, whatever its form, serves as a flag to signal activities in the ongoing stream of behavior that may have some component skills in common (258).

Scribner, S. & Cole, M. (1981) The psychology of literacy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

 


 

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